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Treatable Orthodontic Problems

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At Burch Orthodontics, we make all our patients feel right at home. Our team prides themselves on providing an energetic and fun-loving service to each patient.
Some Class II problems represent an abnormal bite relationship in which the upper jaw and teeth are located in front of the lower jaw and teeth. Class II patients usually exhibit a convex facial profile with a recessed chin. In most cases, this relationship is due to inherited characteristics. 

A skeletal Class II problem occurs when the upper back molars are forward of the lower back molars. This gives the patient the appearance of having a recessed lower jaw, a protruding upper jaw, or both.

If you are experiencing some problems or want to find more information, give us a call at (850) 877-1692

The Right Age? - Burch Orthodontics

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Orthodontists today can successfully correct most problems regardless of the patient’s age. But that does not mean that the orthodontic treatment starting age does not matter. In fact it may play a significant role in the total time and expenses required for the completion of the orthodontic treatment. Early intervention can make a dramatic impact on establishing the proper occlusal foundation. The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that all children have a check-up with an orthodontist by the time they reach age 7, for early detection of any potential problems. By the age 7, some of the permanent teeth have erupted, so that most children have a mix of adult and baby teeth. At this stage of mixed dentition, we can spot potential orthodontic problems related to jaw growth and eruption of adult teeth. Some growth-related orthodontic problems are easier to correct when they are identified early…while the facial bones are still growing. An early exam allows us to dete…

Adjusting to Braces

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Are you a new patient at Burch Orthodontics? You may or may not be excited about wearing your braces, but regardless we know you will be thrilled with the result of your new smile.  As with any change, adjusting to something new can be a little confusing and overwhelming sometimes, so we decided to help you out with a few tips on adjusting to your braces. 

Tip #1: Give yourself some time. Your braces may not be what you expected or wanted, but after a while when your teeth start shifting you will notice how incredible your teeth and smile alignment look.
Pain may occur after your appointments, just give it a few days after each adjustment and you should feel more comfortable. 
Tip #2: Another thing to remember is to be confident. Don't worry about how your braces look and don't be afraid or embarrassed to smile with your braces. Depending on the type of braces you're treated with, people may not even know you're wearing braces.
Be proud and flash those pearly whites ofte…

Braces and Cavities

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If you’re a patient at Burch Orthodontics, you are used to visiting us for your regular adjustment appointment every 6-8 weeks. While our hygienist is in your mouth making those adjustments, it’s important for you to remember our team is working on your braces and trips to your general dentist are still very much needed.
When we work on your braces, we are not looking specifically for any cavities and anything we do notice is a by-product of monitoring your oral health from an orthodontic perspective. Even if we did find something suspicious we don’t have the facilities to correct it.
For this reason, we tell you to maintain your regular dental checkup schedule of once every 6 months. Another important thing to remember is that your oral hygiene needs to be flawless.  
The appliances that are in your mouth are, unfortunately, a magnet for plaque buildup.  If you are a bit lax with brushing and rinsing out your mouth after eating, you may just find that you have a beautiful straight smile…

What Type of Floss is Best?

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If you’ve visited the dental care aisle recently, the sheer number of options available can be overwhelming. We often have patients ask us which floss is the “best” type of floss. In essence, all of the options on the market today do the same thing, and at the end of the day it comes down to personal preference. We’ve listed a few of the options below.
Flossers: Flossers are small plastic instruments with a single floss strip and a pick on the opposite end. This option can be both effective at cleaning the areas in between your teeth and scraping off plaque. These flossers come in flavored varieties as well. They are a great “on the go” option.

Gentle Dental Floss:
Some people will find that regular dental floss is too harsh on their gums. For that reason, several options are available that have soft coatings that are less abrasive on the gums. Typically, gentle floss is just as effective as regular floss and an ideal match for anyone looking for a more sensitive approach to flossing…

Bad Breath & Braces

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After getting braces, new patients may develop bad breath from not cleaning their teeth properly. Simply doing a quick job brushing your teeth is not enough to keep your teeth in great shape, especially when you wear braces. Bacteria feeds on food particles leftover after you eat, and this sneaky bacterium creates an unpleasant odor.
We certainly understand bad breath can be uncomfortable to talk about, but it happens to most of us. The important thing to do if you’re experiencing bad breath (or know someone who is) is to determine the root of the problem. The most common factor for bad breath our patients is almost typically caused by poor oral hygiene.  It's important to brush immediately after every meal or snack or at least rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash if you aren’t able to brush. Bad breath-causing odors and bacteria can also cling to removable orthodontics (like a retainer or clear aligners), so be sure to remove them before eating, even if you're only having…

Eating with Braces

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Now that you have your braces, what foods can you still enjoy? While some foods are off limits, don't worry, you'll be eating popcorn and snacking on potato chips again in no time! However, before you can start enjoying some of the treats you love, you will need to take special care to avoid any foods that could damage your new appliances.



Foods to AVOID with braces:
Chewy foods — bagels, licoriceCrunchy foods — popcorn, chips, iceSticky foods — caramel candies, chewing gumHard foods — nuts, hard candiesFoods that require biting into — corn on the cob, apples, carrotsFoods you CAN eat with braces:
Dairy — soft cheese, pudding, milk-based drinksBreads — soft tortillas, pancakes, muffins without nutsGrains — pasta, soft cooked riceMeats/poultry — soft cooked chicken, meatballs, lunch meatsSeafood — tuna, salmon, crab cakesVegetables — mashed potatoes, steamed spinach, beansFruits — applesauce, bananas, fruit juiceTreats — ice cream without nuts, milkshakes, Jell-O, soft cake